Macbeth
       
     
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Macbeth
       
     
Macbeth

UK National Tour / 2011-2012 / The Globe Neuss, Germany / 2012

Written by  / William Shakespeare

Directed by / Max Lewendel

Set designed by / Mayou Trikerioti  / Costume designed by / Lauren Pratt

Projection design by / Marouso Marinopoulou

Lighting design by / Zachary Holton

photos © Marouso Marinopoulou

REVIEWS

"Mayou Trikerioti's atmospheric set, consisting of grey monolithic pillars with projected images on the moon and shards of broken red light appearing as the intensity of the drama progresses, is striking and, together with Theo Holloway's dynamic pulsating soundscape, provides the perfect backdrop for this taut dramatic tragedy." Robin Strapp, British Theatre Guide

"These witches, clothed simply brown hooded cloaks were living creatures on stage and I was waiting in expectation for the ‘double, double, toil and trouble’ scene which was excellently wicked and simply done, a unique choice of using five small plinths in a circle to represent a cauldron.

The set itself, simple yet striking is all you need to visualise the time and the action on stage. It’s slightly gothic, giving the production that sense of impending tragedy, darkly deeds and most of all its hauntingly atmospheric. Look out for the bane moon and the plinths on stage during the play…" Stage, Screen and the Mistique

"With dry ice, a red cloth that falls down one side of the stage and what looks like steel grey girders dissecting the backdrop the scene is set. The witches hooded and cloaked in brown are suitably creepy, as they croak, bend and twist around the stage.

The staging is effective with different levels used throughout. Mayou Trikerioti's set design includes red lights that splinter the girders at different points in the play underlining the plot and bringing out the themes of desire, death and destruction." Victoria Claringbold, Remotegoat

"Five Stars alone are due to the designers of the simple set and the expressive mood-setting lighting and sound. You'll find out what a bane-moon looks like." David Kerr, Carrick Biz

"The set is simple: an eerie moon overlooking the stage, a fence of stony planks in the background with lightning bolt cracks that light up in evil red, and several stools of wooden blocks with differing heights to enable vertical movements on stage. Each witch has her own peculiar cackle and demeanor, and the audience glimpses the hidden world of the black arts." Fiona Kao, Oxford Theatre Review

"Other highlights of the show were the director’s and designers’ thematic use of the moon as a focal point for the atmosphere of particular scenes with increasing amounts of “spilled blood” cascading from the top of the moon and showing the passing of time with clouds. One especially stellar element was the infamous “double, double toil and trouble” witch brew scene, with a very creative use of fog-like vapour, a piercing spotlight, and flames in the face of the moon to portray a spooky ethereal spirit with a chilling voice." Anna Brown, Oxford Theatre Review

"Already the stage design appears cold and brutal. Arranged in a semi-circle are tall pillars of steel plate which erupt in blood-red over the course of the performance. Swords, daggers and axes dominate the scenery designed by Mayou Trikerioti. Attached above the stage, there is an, initially, bright-white full moon, which changes its appearance according to the events. At times it is split apart, at times it gleams blood-red." Von Magdalena Marek, Newsline

"The staging was stark, dark and fabulous [...]" Elaine Swift, Word Alchemy

 

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